Taunus-Sternwarte

 

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B01

geogr. Länge

 08°26'47,2" E

 

geogr. Breite

50°13'18.0" N

 

Höhe 825m

 

Webcam Gr.Feldberg

Wetter Kl.Feldberg

Wetter 3 Tage

 

Anfahrtsplan

 

 

 

 

Deutsche Version to the german sides

The Taunus Observatory (IAU-Observatory-Code: B01), located in the Taunus mountain range close to Frankfurt am Main, is operated by the Physikalischer Verein Frankfurt, which is one of Germany’s oldest associations, founded in 1824. Regarding to the discovery rate of minor planets, it is one of the most successful observatories in Germany .
 

The main Teleskope

bulletsystem: Cassegrain
bulletdiameter of primary mirror: 0,6 m (24 inch)
bulletprimary focal length: 1,993 m  ( f/3.32 )
bulletdiameter of Wynne-correktor: 0,2m
bulletcorrected diameter of primary focus field : 0,13m
bulletDigitalcamera: SBIG 11000M (FOV: 60'x45')
bulletsecondary focal length: 5,716 m ( f/9.53 )

 

 

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The first minor planet discovery at the Taunus Observatory

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Discovery of a potentially hazardous asteroid (PHA)

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Frankfurt also in the sky - the first naming of one of our discoveries

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Erwin Schwab and Rainer Kling were honored with a minor planet naming

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Soemmerring-award

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Numbered and named minor planets

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released Minor Planet Electronic Circulars

 

The first minor planet discovery at the Taunus Observatory

On 27/11/2006 Rainer Kling and Erwin Schwab discovered the minor planet 2006 WV129. It was the first minor planet dicovered at an observatory of the Association "Physikalischen Verein".

With this discovery, an ancient tradition of the association was continued. Because at the beginning of the 20th century the "Physikalischen Verein" operated the Planeten Institut, which was one of the world's first Minor Planet Centers. The works at that time were essentially theoretical. 2006 WV129, which now has the name Neeffisis, was the first minor planet discovered in the more than 180-years history of the association. The name Neeffisis is a combination of Christian Ernst Neeff and the goddess Isis. Christian Ernst Neeff was co-founder of the association "Physikalischen Verein" in 1824 and its president. The emblem of the association is the goddess Isis.

bullet Orbit of minor planet (224831) Neeffisis

 

Discovery of a potentially hazardous asteroid (PHA)

On 25 February 2009 we were able to discover one of the rare dangerous near-Earth asteroids. 2009 DM45 has a diameter of about 150 meters and approached the earth at a distance of only 5.7 times the Moon distance. It was the 5th discovery of a dangerous asteroid from a German observatory.

bulletEntdeckungsgeschichte und Entdeckungs - Fotos des gefährlichen Asteroiden 2009 DM45

 

Frankfurt also in the sky - the first naming of one of our discoveries

The first minor planet, for which we submitted a naming proposal follows the name (204852) Frankfurt. It was published on 2009 April 9. in the Minor Planet Circular # 65714.

bulletEntdeckungsgeschichte und Entdeckungs - Fotos des (204852) Frankfurt.

 

Erwin Schwab and Rainer Kling were honored with a minor planet naming

The spanish Observatorio de la Sagra honored the two initiators of the Taunus Observatory astrometry project. The minor planets (185638) Erwin Schwab and (185639) Rainer Kling were named after them. On 2009 June 7. the new minor planet names were published in the Minor Planet Circular # 66244.

 

Soemmerring-award

On 2009 July 8. Stefan Karge, Rainer Kling, Erwin Schwab and Ute Zimmer received the Soemmerring-award of the association "Physikalischer Verein" for their work in "astrometry of solar system objects and the discoveries of asteroids".

bulletDie prämierte Arbeit als pdf-Datei
bullet Zusammenfassung der prämierten Arbeit

 

Numbered and named minor planets

97 discoveries were finaly credited until July 2015 to the astronomers of the Taunus Observatory. With this discovery rate the Taunus Observatory is on 5th place of the German observatories (including the professional observatories).

bullet List of Germanys minor planet discovery sites

bullet List of numbered Taunus-Observatory discoveries

bullet List of named Taunus-Observatory discoveries

 

released Minor Planet Electronic Circulars

bullet MPEC 2011-N02 2011 MM4
bullet MPEC 2009-U81 COMET P/2009 SK280 (SPACEWATCH-HILL)
bullet MPEC 2009-Q45 COMET C/2009 Q4 (HILL)
bullet MPEC 2009-Q14 COMET C/2009 P2 (BOATTINI)
bullet MPEC 2009-P37 Observation of Comets
bullet MPEC 2009-P36 COMET C/2009 Q4 (HILL)
bullet MPEC 2009-P18 Observation of Comets
bullet MPEC 2009-O56 COMET C/2009 Q4 (HILL)
bulletMPEC 2009-N19 Observation of Comets
bulletMPEC 2009-N18 Comet P/2009 L2 (YANG-GAO)
bulletMPEC 2009-D81 2009 DM45
bulletMPEC 2007-P32 Comet C/2007 N3 (LULIN)
bulletMPEC 2006-S99 Observation of Comets
bulletMPEC 2006-S50 Observation of Comets

weitere Seiten mit Daten des Taunus Observatoriums (B01)

bullet Beobachtungsstatistik von Gerhard Lehmann
bullet Alle astrometrischen Messungen in der Minor Planet Center - Datenbank
bullet B01 @ Astronomy Data System
bullet B01 @ Near Earth Objects - Dynamic Site
bullet B01 @ List of Observatory Codes of IAU
bulletEphemeriden Abruf-Seite der Asteroiden-Entdeckungen auf der Taunus-Sternwarte
bulletCitations der benannten Entdeckungen an der Taunus-Sternwarte
 

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